Topic:

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY


Not your grandparents' rain barrel

Industrial design students debut concepts for a better rain barrel, compete for cash prizes on March 15.

MSU Denver senior Carl Payne tries out his solar eclipse glasses outside of the new AES building on Auraria Campus. The eclipse is scheduled to start in Denver on Aug. 21, 2017 at 10:43 a.m. and will end at 1:14 p.m. Photo by Alyson McClaran

Something new under the sun

As solar-eclipse fever is sweeping the nation, here's a look at why it’s a big deal now – and why it has been for millennia.

A map of the Earth with a radioactive symbol, biohazard symbol, and skull/crossbones

Murder in Malaysia

Kim Jong-nam’s recent assassination with a chemical agent is part of a macabre tale of life – and death – imitating art.

“My passion has always (been) within space – exploration and manufacturing of future spacecraft,” says Joshua Harris, who was offered a job at Lockheed Martin after working for a year in the Lockheed Martin Space Systems Co-Op Program. The Orion spacecraft hangs in the foreground in the Aerospace and Engineering Sciences Building.

Launched at Lockheed Martin

From a dead-end job to a high-flying career in space manufacturing, Joshua Harris aims for the stars.

Recent MSU Denver biology graduates Rachel Himyak and Stephen Aderholdt take measurements at the Bear Creek watershed.

Majoring in saving the planet

Partnership with EPA draws new generation of students into the field.

Antonio Bellisario, professor of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, stands amid a rock glacier in the Chilean Andes. “Chile is going through a process of changing the water laws,” Bellisario said. “There’s a whole impetus now from civil society for glaciers to be protected.”

The shape of water's future

MSU Denver-led research in the Andes targets solutions to Chile’s dwindling supply.

Engineering students want to add electricity to your commute, will debut charger at April 21 research conference.

When riding your bike also charges your phone

Engineering students want to add electricity to your commute, will debut charger at April 21 research conference.

Stronger at the broken places

Fixing bone fractures has stayed the same for 200 years. These engineering students aim to change that via 3-D printing.

Students Alan Silva and Rayito Ornelas from partner institution Universidad del Valle de Atemajac in Zapopan, Mexico touch the water at one of the ponds at the Botanic Gardens in Denver. Photo by Alyson McClaran

Ripple effect

Denver’s urban university and botanic garden team up to make an even bigger impact on water issues in Colorado.

MSU Denver senior Lily Asadullina tests the pH level of different solutions with professor April Hill at a lab in the Science Building. The machine Asadullina uses called LabQuest gives audible instructions of pH levels to keep her independent while working. Photo by Alyson McClaran

Perfect chemistry

How a professor’s experiment of bonding with the blind has introduced hundreds of visually impaired students to science.

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Under the surface of sci-fi

Film series explores xenophobia, sexism and other social issues through fantasy

At Denver Botanic Gardens, they’re using the water they pull from the air to water an herb garden, which it turn is used in Pizza sold at the Botanic Garden’s Hive Garden Bistro. Photo by Alyson McClaran

Water, water, everywhere …

How the emerging practice of capturing vapor may provide an answer to drought – and a tasty lunch

Graduating senior Abdalla Elmedani earned a degree in dental surgery from the University of Khartoum in Sudan, but he went back to school at MSU Denver to follow his real passion: computer science. Photo by Alyson McClaran

1 out of 5 dentists recommend computer science

Graduating senior Abdalla Elmedani left a career and a continent behind to follow his passion at MSU Denver.

While most people try to avoid insects, biology alum Brad Hiatt has dedicated his life to studying the

Brad loves bugs ... and life

While most people try to avoid insects, this biology alum has dedicated his life to studying the 'small, beautiful creatures.'

Jonathan Spencer Martinez was one of 10 students who traveled to Guadalajara, Mexico, last summer to put humanitarian engineering into practice.

Solving big problems with small solutions

When it comes to career choices, student Jonathan Spencer Martinez is thinking small – as in nanotechnology.

Left to right, Eddie Romero-Moreida, Seth Hosford, Alma Ochoa

“We’re there to help and to heal”

How do we fill 2.4 million new jobs? Three students discuss one program’s impact on workforce – and community – development.

5 kinds of winter weather you really want to avoid – and why

There are many kinds of misery in winter, but which is the worst? Associate Professor of Meteorology Keah Schuenemann offers a guide.

Graduates of the Colorado Center for Medical Laboratory Science thrive in a hidden and high-demand health care profession. Photo: Sara Hertwig

The scientists you’ll never meet, who might just save your life

Graduates of the Colorado Center for Medical Laboratory Science thrive in a hidden and high-demand health care profession.

Graduate Hannah Wagoner shows girls they can rock at science.

Breaking down barriers in STEM

Graduating senior Hannah Wagoner shows girls they can rock at science.

Phil Danielson, Ph.D., has spent decades pioneering advances in forensic science to help solve crimes - just don

Meet the molecular man

Phillip Danielson, Ph.D., has spent decades pioneering advances in forensic science to help solve crimes – just don’t mention a certain TV series

As seen on May 30, 2017 in Kwajalein Atoll in the Republic of the Marshall Islands an ICBM-class target was launched from the Reagan Test Site. A ground-based interceptor was launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, and its exo-atmospheric kill vehicle later intercepted and destroyed the target in a direct collision. Photo courtesy of Orbital ATK

It actually is rocket science

Alumna Samantha Sizemore on missile defense, space station missions and getting what you want out of the college experience.

A half-scale model of a weather station produced by students from the Department of Industrial Design at Metropolitan State University of Denver. One of 11 student design concepts will replace the current weather station at the Denver Botanic Gardens.

Budding designers grow skills at Denver Botanic Gardens

Industrial design students develop new weather station for legendary locale.

Three MSU Denver students are among 13 fellows from five Colorado universities who will complete a STEM policy program with Reps. Chris Hansen and Bob Rankin. Photo by Mark Stahl

Engineering meets influence in STEM policy program

Three students from MSU Denver are selected for the first Colorado Science and Engineering Policy Fellowship.

Members of the Society of Physics Students walk toward the giant receivers of the Very Large Array telescope outside of Socorro, New Mexico.

Catching a (radio) wave

Students trade sunglasses for telescopes in their spring break road trip to a famed research facility.

Outside of the OWOW building on 9th Street Park.

Take a Coffee Break with OWOW

Fill up a cup as we chat with Tom Cech and Nona Shipman from the One World One Water Center.

By taking concurrent-enrollment classes at Metropolitan State University of Denver while attending the Denver Center for International Studies, Alex Jones earned a college degree before receiving his high school diploma.

Degree before diploma

18-year-old will graduate from MSU Denver, then from high school.

How does a federal officer end up as the top tech leader in a construction firm? For Jim Qualteri, it

The Unlikely CIO

How does a federal officer end up as the top tech leader in a construction firm? It’s all about problem-solving and leadership.

Dan and Paul Tighe mix drinks at Tighe Brothers Distillery in Denver

That’s the spirit

For alum Dan Tighe, a distillery is a family affair.

Jeff Pollmiller (left) and Greg Lopez (right), graduates of MSU Denver’s co-op program, work with one of Lockheed Martin

Wanted: apprentices. Must love work

Why programs that blend work-based learning and traditional academics might be the future of higher education.

A realistic-looking representation of what Homo naledi may have looked like.

Meet your new cousin...

The human family just got bigger, with the discovery of a new species deep in a South African cave.

Connor Cottrill will graduate from MSU Denver

Change is a-brewin’

From dentistry to first-place individual and team finishes in prestigious beer competitions, this grad’s tapping into transformation.

Heart monitor

The science of love – why we go gooey on Valentine’s Day

What actually happens to us when our gentler emotions are roused? Our psychology expert Mary Ann Watson explains.

MSU Denver

Partnership addresses Colorado's water challenges

MSU Denver and the Denver Botanic Gardens want people to care about water conservation.

Keah Schuenemann, Ph.D., stands in front of the Sawyer glacier in Alaska as part of an MSU Denver class offered in May 2015 to study Alaskan glaciers and ecosystems.

Cold, hard facts about the new iceberg

Meteorology faculty member discusses the implications of ice the size of Delaware breaking off from a shelf in Antarctica.

An image of HAL 9000 from "2001: A Space Odyssey." Image credit: René Spitz, https://www.flickr.com/photos/renespitz/6085714636 [CC BY 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/)]

Out of this world

Sci-fi film series explores the science of how imagination takes flight into other dimensions.

A January 2018 study by the nonprofit Pew Research Center found that 50 percent of women in STEM experienced discrimination in the workplace versus 41 percent of women in non-STEM jobs and 19 percent of men in STEM. Photo by Mark Stahl

Women in STEM

Here's how female STEM students deal with gender-based challenges and how alums in the workforce are making it work.

Alumna Michael Roos is charged up to begin doctoral studies in physics this fall, after completing a prestigious internship at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory this past summer. He stands here in front of a white board with complex equations written on it. Photo credit: Sara Hertwig

Tapping into your potential (energy)

Want to know one alum’s formula for landing a prestigious internship and a path to doctoral studies in physics? Read on.

For the past 14 years, Metropolitan State University of Denver has been home to one of three grant-funded Teaching With Primary Sources regional hubs that offer professional development for educators and administer grants to universities, school districts, library systems and other organizations on behalf of the Library of Congress.  Photo by Peggy O

Straight from the source

Smithsonian and Library of Congress throw open their digital doors, giving teachers access to troves of unfiltered information

Gabrielle Katz, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at MSU Denver, has been studying river hydrology and its impact on ecosystems for the last two decades. Photo by Alyson McClaran

Bridging troubled waters

Professor’s expertise sheds light on impact of 2013 Colorado floods.

MSU Denver alumni Dan Strawn went from being homeless living on couches and in his car to getting an education and becoming a rocket scientist. Photo by Alyson McClaran

From homelessness to rocket science

An alumnus proves the sky is the limit with small steps and an eye toward helping others.

MSU Denver senior Connor O

Invasion of the butterflies!

The Colorado sky has metamorphosed into a sea of color, thanks to the arrival of a very specific winged visitor.

Ian Hodges teaches kids at Park Hill Elementary School while student holds up a timeline

Paving a STEMpath for teachers

Tech startup, nonprofit help University address K-12 shortage.